Solidarity in Development: Empowering Agents of Change

This year’s conference theme, Solidarity in Development: Empowering Agents of Change, seeks to highlight the positive impacts individuals, organizations, and communities can have addressing the many global challenges of today's world. Pragmatic solidarity leads to action, engagement, and accompaniment beyond the traditional notion of solidarity as an attitude. Accompaniment provides an opportunity for the mutual exchange of knowledge and experience among development actors. This collaboration between all agents of change can bring about inclusive and sustainable development outcomes for a world facing innumerable issues, from a pandemic and climate crisis to international conflict and food insecurity.

To apply to present at the 2023 Human Development Conference, please submit a 250-word abstract of your research. Guidelines for tips on writing abstracts are available on the HDC website. In line with this year’s theme of empowering changemakers, there will be both in-person and virtual presentation opportunities, as well as panels conducted in English, French, and Spanish, to increase conference accessibility and include the many perspectives that deserve a place in important conversations of human development.

HDC TEAM
Chairs

 

Maura Hogaboom - Conference Co-chair

Maura is a senior at Notre Dame from Arlington Heights, Illinois studying Economics and Pre-Health Studies with a minor in Poverty Studies.  She is also a member of the Glynn Family Honors Program. Maura is a research assistant at the Lab for Economic Opportunities which seeks to evaluate poverty interventions to better understand what works in poverty alleviation. She also works in partnership with the Palliative Care Association of Uganda through the Center for Hospice Care in Mishawaka. Maura took part in the International Summer Service Program and remotely interned with Child Family Health International in Bolivia, researching adolescent pregnancy and mental health care in Bolivian populations. Previously, Maura worked with Chicago’s underserved communities through Esperanza Health Centers, and she is eager to pursue work in global public health in the future.  After being a Co-Chair of the Liaisons Committee last year, Maura is excited to create an inclusive space for collaboration and dialogue with many presenters and attendees through HDC 2023!

 

Hannah Reynolds - Conference Co-chair

Hannah is a senior studying Economics and Global Affairs with a concentration in International Development and a minor in Education, Schooling and Society. On campus, she works for the Pulte Institute for Global Development as a research assistant on the Expanding the Reach of Impact Evaluation and Developing the Whole Child in Haiti projects and as a teaching assistant for the Data for Development course. This past summer she was a recipient of the Kellogg/Kroc Research Grant and conducted independent research on stakeholder value of vocational education for girls in northern Uganda. She is passionate about the intersection of international development and education and hopes to pursue a career in international education policy. After serving as the Liaison Co-Chair for last year's conference, she is excited to join the HDC team again and help create an engaging and exciting conference for both presenters and attendees!

Marketing

 

Annabelle Lake

Hello HDC! My name is Annabelle Lake and I am a senior living in Farley Hall as an RA. I study Marketing with minors in French and CST, and outside of classes, I'm involved with the Center for Social Concerns and I work in the career center! In my free time, according to my resume's “interests” section, I enjoy ​​puzzles, baking, hand lettering, photography, babysitting, sunbathing, thrifting, exercising, and podcasts. Really excited to be involved with HDC this year!

 

Claudia Tang

Claudia is a senior from Honolulu, Hawai’i, majoring in Business Technology. On campus, she is the design editor of Scholastic Magazine and is involved in Hawai’i club. She is also currently a research assistant for Professor Bergstrand’s Economic Integration Agreement database, and a senior fellow for internationalization. In her free time, she enjoys cooking for friends and fiber arts. Claudia is excited about being part of the HDC team and is looking forward to a great conference this spring!

Liaisons Committee

 

Nadim "Khouzi" Khouzam

I'm a sophomore living in Dillon Hall! I'm majoring in Neuroscience and minoring in Anthropology on the pre-med track. I'm from the greatest city in the U.S.A, Memphis, TN. I love to play sports, listen to music, and play the piano.

 

Fabrice Uwihirwe

Fabrice is a junior studying Economics and Global Affairs. He is part of the Kellogg International Scholars Program, and has an interest in doing research targeted at poverty alleviation, specifically in his home country of Rwanda. Recently, he has been looking at the role of NGOs and the expansion of women's participation in politics as they pertain to combating poverty and providing opportunities.

Multimedia Presentations Committee

 

Maya Mehigan

Hi! My name is Maya, and I am a sophomore majoring in Global Affairs and Environmental Science (pre-law track) from Richmond, VA. A couple of my passions include mental health awareness and environmental advocacy. On campus, I am involved in Active Minds Club, the Student Union Board, environmental research, and I also manage a few organization's social media accounts. I'm so excited to help coordinate the HDC journey!

 

Ashlyn Poppe

Ashlyn is a sophomore from Wyckoff, New Jersey studying Global Affairs and European Studies. She is a Kellogg International Scholar currently performing research under Dr. Edward (Ted) Beatty. On campus, Ashlyn is the Director of Operations for BridgeND, Social Media Director for Notre Dame Television, and an Academic Tutor at the Robinson Community Learning Center. This summer, Ashlyn studied abroad in London, UK and hopes to pursue more travel and research in Europe in the future. Ashlyn attended the HDC during her first year at Notre Dame and is eager to bring her personal interests and experience to the team this year!

Logistics

 

Juliet Webb

Juliet is a senior studying Anthropology, Peace Studies and Education, Schooling & Society at the University of Notre Dame. Originally from Larchmont, New York, Juliet has been passionate about education since she was young. Juliet is currently working on her senior Capstone project, an initiative in which she aims to investigate the many ways elementary education teachers build strong relationships with their students. This past summer, she travelled to Senegal on behalf of an organization she's been involved with since high school; while there, she began her Capstone research amongst a group of high school students in the village of Lambaye. The source of inspiration for her participation in HDC last year and an internship (through Notre Dame's ISSLP) during the summer of 2021, Juliet's greatest hope is to return to Senegal after Notre Dame, particularly in the realm of international education. Juliet is so excited to be a part of the HDC community again, and can't wait to contribute to what is sure to be another incredible conference weekend!

 

Grace Clinton

My name is Grace Clinton and I am a junior studying Biology and Global Affairs with a focus in Anthropology. I hope to attend medical school and use my education to create sustainable healthcare systems and practices in respect to culture. HDC offers a way for cutting-edge research and experiences to be shared and discussed, thus providing a tangible catalyst for positive change.

 

Grace Ducat

Grace is a senior from Kernersville, North Carolina majoring in Science Pre-Professional Studies with minors in Anthropology and International Development Studies. She is interested in education as a part of human and international development, especially the education of stigmatized or marginalized groups such as those with disabilities. This past summer, she received a Kellogg/Kroc Undergraduate Research Grant to study special needs education in Makeni, Sierra Leone for 7 weeks. Her International Development capstone and Anthropology thesis focus on the challenges with inclusive education in mainstream schools in and around Makeni. On campus, Grace serves as the Senior Fellow in  Badin Hall and is involved in various organizations on campus including the Kellogg Institute and Anthropology club. In her free time, Grace enjoys spending time with her friends, cooking and baking, and reading. She is excited to continue finding ways to join her academic interests in Anthropology and International Development by getting involved with HDC and help to carry out a great conference this spring!

Abstracts

 

Nick Clarizio

Nick is a Senior. His academic background ranged from Astrophysics to Political Science before he settled on a major in Anthropology. He is passionate about food, languages, people, and the environment. Pursuing these passions has taken him from Southern Italy to Norway and allowed him to become fluent in French and Italian. He hopes that the next step on this journey will be a Master's degree in Food Studies at NYU.

 

Natalie Selover

Natalie is a senior from Atlanta, GA studying International Economics with a French concentration and minors in Poverty Studies and Education, Schooling, and Society. Her research interests are mostly focused on education and economics, and last year she presented her research on modern Native American migration patterns at HDC. She studied in Angers, France in the fall of 2021 and is currently writing her thesis on the potential impacts of France leaving the European Union. She loves to travel, swim, and be outdoors.

 

Call for Papers
 

The Ford Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, part of the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame, announce the 15th annual Human Development Conference.

For fifteen years, the Human Development Conference has provided a forum for undergraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds and disciplines who are passionate about development to engage in dialogue about development research.

The 2023 Human Development Conference, themed Solidarity in Development: Empowering Agents of Change, will encourage participants to consider how pragmatic solidarity and accompaniment can provide an opportunity for collaboration and ultimately bring about inclusive and sustainable development outcomes. This year’s conference seeks to highlight the positive impacts individuals, organizations, and communities can have in addressing the many global challenges of today’s world.

We welcome and invite all undergraduate students to share their research experiences from a broad spectrum of topics in human development, including but not limited to:

  • Agriculture
  • Architecture
  • Anthropology
  • Business
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • Environment
  • Foreign Aid
  • Gender
  • Governance
  • Global Health
  • Human Dignity
  • Human Rights
  • Infrastructure
  • Migration 
  • Peace/Conflict
  • Poverty
  • Public Policy
  • Religion
  • Sociology
  • Sustainability
  • Technology
  • Urbanization

 

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate students interested in presenting should submit an abstract of their research projects: click here. The final submission deadline has been extended to Monday, November 14th, 2022, at 11:59 PM. Guidelines for tips on writing abstracts are available on the HDC website.

In line with this year’s theme of empowering changemakers, there will be both in-person and virtual presentation opportunities, as well as panels conducted in English, French, and Spanish, to increase conference accessibility and include the many perspectives that deserve a place in important conversations of human development.

We hope that you will join us in participating in this important conversation!

Abstract Guidelines

 

A good abstract that will be considered for the 2023 Human Development Conference does each of the following:

  1. Briefly introduces the reader to the topic by providing relevant background information on global research performed in-person or virtually
  2. Clearly expresses the research question that was asked
  3. Provides concrete details about the methodology used (including where the study was conducted, how many participants were involved, recruitment method, and type of data analysis)
  4. Presents research findings that answer the proposed question

Abstracts must be no more than 250 words long. Sample abstracts that have been accepted to previous Human Development Conferences are provided below:

Sample Abstract 1

Sub-saharan Africa currently bears 24% of the global disease burden, yet is home to just 3% of the global health workforce (Anyangwe 2007). Despite this crippling disease burden, nearly 45% of graduating physicians in Uganda plan to emigrate upon graduation (Kizito 2015). Medical brain drain refers to this human resource crisis that plagues the healthcare systems of many developing countries, where newly graduated physicians choose to leave the country after receiving their formal medical education. For over a decade, public health leaders have attempted to meet this critical human resource shortage through an increase in the availability and efficacy of medical education (Akuffo 2014). Through in-depth interviews with over 40 medical students at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, my research attempts to uncover the complex push and pull factors that affect the emigration decisions of Ugandan medical students. While past research points to low pay and high overburden on health professionals as the impetus of the brain drain, my project identifies sociocultural factors that influence emigration like social ties, national pride and shame, socioeconomic background, as well as lived experience in the health system. These results provide tangible recommendations for public sector managers and policy makers in Uganda to help curb brain drain in their health system.

Sample Abstract 2

Although the Ministry of Health recommends yearly cervical screening through Pap tests, Nicaragua has one of the highest cervical cancer mortality rates in Latin America due to pervasive barriers that women face in accessing healthcare. One aim of this study was to explore strategies to mitigate these barriers in culturally appropriate and feasible ways, including primary prevention and secondary prevention through Human Papillomavirus (HPV) self-collection. HPV self-collection is an innovative and empirically based strategy shown to increase cervical cancer screening for women in lower resourced settings. Utilizing a collection brush, women can collect their sample in a setting of their choice and send the sample to get tested. We partnered with the Ministry of Health, a local human rights NGO and interprofessional collaboration in Bluefields (the largest city on the Caribbean Coast) to conduct a community-based needs assessment, key informant interviews (n=12), focus groups (n=25) and a systematic environmental scan, all guided by the socio-ecological model. We audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim all data. We analyzed descriptive statistics and through thematic analysis, we analysed qualitative data. According to our findings, the main barriers were: cultural obstacles, machismo being the main issue, misconceptions about prevention, and a lack of systematic and comprehensive sexual health education. If rolled-out under specific circumstances, HPV self-collection could increase access to cervical cancer screening for women in Bluefields and the surrounding rural areas by overcoming these barriers, thus empowering women to take agency over their health. More research is needed to pilot this intervention.

Sample Abstract 3

Dubbed as the worst country to be disabled by the British Broadcasting Corporation, 95% of people in Ghana have no access to rehabilitative services (Tinney 11-12). Without a systemic chronic disease policy, organizations and researchers have paid little attention to study amputees and invest in rehabilitative care despite their unprecedented growth. Although there are clear financial, logistical, and social barriers to receiving care, it is unclear what factors impact an amputee’s decision to be treated or whether a prosthesis is desired in the first place. The study aims to research the ability, choice, and desire to pursue prosthetic services from the viewpoint of amputees. Between July and August 2016, data was collected through 24 interviews with healthcare providers, amputees, and prosthesis-users in the Cape Coast and Accra region. Ethnographic research methods were used to analyzed key distribution and health facilities which found that (1) rehabilitative facilities in Ghana for prost

The Ford Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, part of the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame, announce the 15th annual Human Development Conference.

For fifteen years, the Human Development Conference has provided a forum for undergraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds and disciplines who are passionate about development to engage in dialogue about development research.  

The 2023 Human Development Conference, themed Solidarity in Development: Empowering Agents of Change, will encourage participants to consider how pragmatic solidarity and accompaniment can provide an opportunity for collaboration and ultimately bring about inclusive and sustainable development outcomes. This year’s conference seeks to highlight the positive impacts individuals, organizations, and communities can have in addressing the many global challenges of today’s world

Multi-Media Requirements: Multi-media project submissions may include–but are not limited to–photos, videos, musical arrangements, paintings, drawings, ceramics, posters, collages, or another form of media. You may submit up to 2 pieces total. For each piece please include:

  • Title
  • Location of media (if applicable)
  • Approximate date of media creation
  • A paragraph-long description of the work describing the people, the place, and how creating the piece of media affected your understanding of human development

Please keep the following considerations in mind when submitting media:

  • All submissions must have been created by the individual submitting the piece.
  • Whether the people in the photo or video would want to see their likeness displayed as it is in the piece of media. Photos or videos of children or individuals who were not able to consent to have their photo taken should not be submitted.
  • Consider media carefully and ensure that you do not submit a piece of media that might negatively impact a person’s safety or reputation.

In line with this year’s theme of empowering changemakers, there will be both in-person and virtual presentation opportunities to increase conference accessibility and include the many perspectives that deserve a place in important conversations of human development.

Undergraduate students interested in sharing art projects of mixed media: click here to apply. The final submission deadline is Monday, January 16th, 2023, at 11:59 PM.

More information can be found on our website, Instagram, and Facebook Page.

We hope that you will join us in participating in this important conversation!

 Bartell Prize

The Rev. Ernest J. Bartell, CSC, Prize for Undergraduate Research on Poverty and Development is conferred annually at the University of Notre Dame's Human Development Conference. Two $1,000 prizes recognize outstanding undergraduate student research on poverty and development. Each year one prize will be given to a student at the University of Notre Dame and one to a student from another university.

Undergraduate students invited to present at the 2023 Human Development Conference are eligible to apply for this award. Information regarding how to apply is included in the conference invitation. Students who wish to be considered must apply by Monday, January 16, 2023. Additional information and/or an interview may be required. Finalists will be notified in the beginning of  February.

Student research should address a specific aspect of poverty and development, whether in the United States or abroad. Research may be submitted from any field of study, including the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities. Students are encouraged to conduct original research and to consider programs and policies that could help reduce poverty.  A faculty committee will determine the award recipients, and prizes will be conferred during the Human Development Conference, February 24-25, 2023.

Accommodations

 
Local Hotels

A list of local hotels that previous conference presenters have stayed at (please note travel time to campus from each hotel differs): 

Embassy Suites
1140 E Angela Blvd
South Bend, IN 46617
(855) 213-6794

The Fairfield Inn and Suites
1220 East Angela Boulevard
South Bend, IN 46637
(574) 234-5510

Inn at Saint Mary's
53993 US 933
South Bend, Indiana 46637
To make reservations, contact Shelby Nelson at 574.323.2465

The Morris Inn
1399 Notre Dame Avenue
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556
(574) 631-2000
Toll free (800) 280-7256


Helpful Information for Travel to South Bend

The majority of the conference will be held at the Hesburgh Center for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame, located in Notre Dame, Indiana. (Note: This is not to be confused with the Hesburgh Library, which is also located on the Notre Dame campus. You can distinguish the two by noting that the library is 13 stories tall, while the Hesburgh Center is not).

Please note that the University of Notre Dame is in the Eastern Time Zone.

Notre Dame, Indiana, is 90 miles east of Chicago. The surrounding communities are South Bend and Mishawaka.

Car Travel

From the north, east, or west (ex. Chicago)

The University is located South of the Indiana Toll Road (Interstate 80/90).

  • Take exit 77 toward IN-933/US-31/South Bend/Notre Dame from I-80/90 E.
  • Turn right onto Indiana 933 South/South Dixie Way. Proceed 1.1 miles.
  • Turn left at the 4th stoplight onto Angela Boulevard. Proceed 0.8 miles.
  • Turn left at the 1st stoplight onto Notre Dame Avenue.
  • Turn right at the 1st stop sign onto Holy Cross Drive.
  • Signs will identify visitor parking.

From the south (ex. Indianapolis)

  • Take US 31 North. It becomes Indiana 933/US 31/Michigan Street just south of South Bend.
  • Proceed on Indiana 933/US 31/North to Angela Boulevard, which is the second stop light north of the St. Joseph River.
  • Turn left at the 1st stoplight onto Notre Dame Avenue.
  • Turn right at the 1st stop sign onto Holy Cross Drive.
  • Signs will identify visitor parking.
Air Travel

Flying into the South Bend Regional Airport: Arriving at the South Bend Regional Airport can be a convenient way to travel to Notre Dame. Airlines serving South Bend include Allegiant, Delta, and United Airlines.

Cab fare from the South Bend Regional Airport is approximately $15. There are typically cabs waiting outside the airport. A list of South Bend Regional Airport approved cab services is available on the airport website at http://flysbn.com/transportation/taxi-train-bus/

Flying into Chicago Airports: Flying into Chicago O'Hare or Midway Airport can be a cheaper way to travel to Notre Dame. Bus transportation is available from both Chicago airports directly to the campus of Notre Dame. Train transportation is also available from Chicago to the South Bend Regional Airport via the South Shore Line.

Train Travel

From Chicago O’Hare to Millennium Station

Follow the signs in the airport for trains to the city. In the train area, follow the flashing yellow light to find the train that is loading passengers. Take the Blue Line towards the Forest Park Terminal to Washington station. From that stop, walk one block north on Dearborn Street and 3 blocks east on Randolph Street to arrive at Millennium Station, where you can board the South Shore Line to the South Bend airport.

On the way back to Chicago O’Hare, take the South Shore Line to Chicago’s Millennium Station. Walk 3 blocks west along Randolph Street to Dearborn Street. Turn left on Dearborn Street and proceed to the Washington subway station for the Blue Line. Follow overhead signs towards Chicago O'Hare. Ride the train to the O'Hare Station, which is at the end of the line. The train ride to O’Hare takes approximately 40 minutes and runs every 5–10 minutes depending on the time of day.

From Chicago Midway to Millennium Station

Follow the signs in the airport for trains to the city. Board the Orange Line and take it to the Randolph/Wabash station. Walk 1 block east on Randolph Street to arrive at Millennium Station, where you will board the South Shore Line to the South Bend airport.

On the way back to Chicago Midway, take the South Shore Line to Chicago’s Millennium Station at Randolph Street. Walk 1 block west along Randolph Street to Wabash Avenue and enter the Randolph/Wabash station for the Orange Line. Follow signs and take the train marked with orange signs to Midway Airport. Ride to the Midway Station, which is at the end of the line. The train ride to Midway takes about 30 minutes and runs every 5–10 minutes depending on the time of day. Follow the signs and take the overhead passage to the airport terminal, about one-quarter mile.

From Chicago’s Millennium Station to the South Bend Regional Airport

The South Shore Line commuter train travels from downtown Chicago to the South Bend Regional Airport. One-way fare is $14.25. The train takes about three hours to travel from Millennium Station to South Bend, but keep in mind the one-hour time change between South Bend and Chicago. Additional information is available at https://www.mysouthshoreline.com/. To arrive at the downtown terminal of the South Shore Line in Chicago (Millennium Station), take the Blue Line train from O’Hare Airport or the Orange Line train from Midway Airport (see above).

From Cities across the Country

Amtrak runs directly to South Bend. After arriving at the station, you would then need to call a taxi or uber to take you to the Notre Dame campus. Please refer to www.amtrak.com for schedules.

Bus Travel

From Cities across the Country: Greyhound stops at South Bend Regional Airport. Schedules and stations are available at www.greyhound.com.

Conference Sponsors:

 

 

More information can be found on our socials:

https://www.instagram.com/notredamehdc/   https://www.facebook.com/notredamehdc/