The Kellogg Institute for International Studies celebrated the immense, forward-looking legacy of its founding academic director, the eminent political scientist Guillermo O’Donnell (1936–2011), with an academic conference focusing on his many contributions to democratization studies and his active engagement in the real world of politics in Latin America. 

Convened in O’Donnell’s hometown of Buenos Aires in collaboration with institutional partners in Argentina and the US, the conference brought together many of the most distinguished scholars in Latin American politics and democratization studies. Speakers focused on five themes of study in which O'Donnell made pivotal intellectual contributions and offer reflections on his approach to studying politics.

  • New Takes on Modernization, Authoritarianism, and Democracy
  • New Takes on the Political Economy of Authoritarianism and Democratization
  • Institutions and Democratic Citizenship
  • Delegative Democracy
  • Quality of Democracy 

O’Donnell was deeply committed to improving the workings of democracy, the lives of citizens, and the relationship between citizens and their government. Conference participants honored this normative focus by connecting problems of contemporary relevance to O’Donnell’s seminal work. 

An edited volume of articles drawn from the conference is planned. 

Conference Organizers: Scott Mainwaring (University of Notre Dame), Marcelo Leiras (Universidad de San Andrés, Buenos Aires), and Daniel Brinks (University of Texas, Austin)

With generous financial support from the Ford Foundation, Santiago Office, and the Fundación OSDE

Celebratory Tribute

March 27, 2012  6:30pm

Fundación OSDE

Following the conference, a memorial tribute and celebratory reception honored Guillermo O’Donnell’s life and work. It also marked the 30th anniversary of Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute of International Studies, which he was instrumental in establishing and which carries on his legacy in its research and teaching. 

Among those attending were many of the most significant figures in the study and practice of democracy and human development in the region, Notre Dame alumni, and friends of Guillermo O’Donnell and the Kellogg Institute from near and far.

Monday, March 26
Tuesday, March 27
Fundación OSDE Auditorium
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Monday, March 26

9:00am-9:10am

Welcome: Daniel Brinks, Marcelo Leiras , Scott Mainwaring, and Gabriela Ippolito-O’Donnell

9:10am–10:45am

Panel 1: New Takes on Modernization, Authoritarianism, and Democracy

Chair: José María Ghio (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella)
“Democratic Breakdown and Survival in Latin America, 1945–2005”
Aníbal Pérez–Liñán (University of Pittsburgh) and Scott Mainwaring (University of Notre Dame)
Discussant: Alfred Stepan (Columbia University)
“Argentina’s Democracy Four Decades After Modernization and Bureaucratic Authoritarianism”
Carlos Gervasoni (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella)
Discussant: Eduardo Viola (Universidade de Brasília)
“Income and Democracy: Theoretical Significance of the Argentine Exception”
Marcelo Leiras (Universidad de San Andrés)
Discussant: Rodrigo Zarazaga, SJ (Centro de Investigación y Acción Social)

10:45am–11:00am

Break

11:00am–1:00pm

Panel 2: New Takes on the Political Economy of Authoritarianism and Democratization

Chair: Abraham Lowenthal (University of Southern California)
“Class Structure, Distributive Conflict, and Democracy: Brazil and Argentina in Comparative Perspective”
James McGuire (Wesleyan University)
Discussant: Ximena Simpson (Universidad Nacional de San Martín)
“New Alliances for a New State Rentier Populism and the Emergence of Plebiscitarian Hegemonies in South America”
Sebastian Mazzuca (University of California, Berkeley)
Discussant: Carlos Acuña (Universidad de San Andrés)
“Democracy and Inequality: Latin America and the United Sates Compared”
Terry Lynn Karl (Stanford University)
Discussant: Luis Tonelli (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
“Democracy and Markets: Notes on a Twenty-first Century Paradox”
Robert Fishman (University of Notre Dame)
Discussant: Evelyne Huber (University of North Carolina)

1:00pm–1:45pm

Lunch

1:45pm–3:15pm

Panel 3: Institutions and Democratic Citizenship

Chair: M. Gloria Trocello (Universidad Nacional de San Luis)
“Understanding Institutional Change: Lessons from Latin America”
Steven Levitsky (Harvard University) and María Victoria Murillo (Columbia University)
Discussant: Michael Coppedge (University of Notre Dame)
“Democracy, Citizenship, and the Rule of Law”
Daniel Brinks (University of Texas, Austin) and Sandra Botero (University of Notre Dame)
Discussant: Paola Bergallo (Universidad de San Andrés)
“Two Items Left Over from My Discussions with Guillermo: The Consolidation of Democracy and the Rule of Law”
Philippe Schmitter (European University Institute)
Discussant: Catalina Smulovitz (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella)

3:15pm–3:30pm

Break

3:30pm–5:00pm

Panel 4: Delegative Democracy

Chair: Alberto Föhrig (Universidad de San Andrés)
“Delegative Presidential Leadership”
María Matilde Ollier (Universidad Nacional de San Martín)
Discussant: Martín D’Alessandro (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
“Unpacking Delegative Democracy: Digging into the Empirical Content of a Rich Theoretical Concept”
Lucas González (Universidad Católica Argentina, Universidad Nacional de San Martín)
Discussant: Gustavo Dufour (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
“The Various Accountability Deficits of Delegative Democracies”
Enrique Peruzzotti (Universidad Torcuato Di Tella)
Discussant: Isidoro Cheresky (Universidad de Buenos Aires)

7:00pm

Dinner

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

9:00am–10:00am

Panel 5: Quality of Democracy

Chair: Miguel De Luca (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
“Conceptualizing the Quality of Democracy: Issues and Insights in the Framing of a New Agenda”
Gerardo Munck (University of Southern California)
Discussant: David Collier (University of California, Berkeley)
“Democracy, Citizenship, and the State: O'Donnell's Critique of Procedural Democracy”
Jorge Vargas Cullell (Programa Estado de la Nación, Costa Rica)
Discussant: Francisco Weffort (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro)

10:00am–11:00am

Panel 6: Perspectives on O’Donnell’s Work
Chair: Timothy Scully (University of Notre Dame)
“Advantages and Downsides of Three of O’Donnell’s Convictions”
Laurence Whitehead (Oxford University)
Discussant: David Lehmann (Cambridge University)
“Theorizing a Moving Target: O’Donnell’s Changing Views of Postauthoritarian Regimes”
Timothy Power (Oxford University)
Discussant: Cynthia Arnson (Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars)

11:00am–11:15am

Break

11:15am–12:30pm

Closing Session: Advancing the Research Agenda on Democratization

Chair: Scott Mainwaring
Participant Discussion on moving conference ideas forward
Closing Remarks: Daniel Brinks, Marcelo Leiras, Scott Mainwaring, and Gabriela Ippolito-O’Donnell

Carlos H. Acuña

Carlos H. Acuña (PhD, University of Chicago) is professor and director of the Administration and Public Politics Master’s Program at the University of San Andrés and principal investigator at CONICET (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas). A former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow, Acuña has taught at Universidad de Buenos Aires, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, and the University of Chicago. His research focuses on comparative politics and public and economic policy. He is the author of numerous articles and books. 

Cynthia J. Arnson

Cynthia J. Arnson (PhD, Johns Hopkins University) is director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. She is a member of the editorial advisory board of Foreign Affairs Latinoamérica and of the advisory board of Human Rights Watch/Americas, where she served as associate director (1990–94). She is editor of In the Wake of War: Democratization and Internal Armed Conflict in Latin America (Stanford University Press/Woodrow Wilson Center Press, forthcoming) and author of Crossroads: Congress, the President, and Central America, 1976–1993 (2d ed., Penn State Press, 1993), among other works.

Paola Bergallo

Paola Bergallo (LLM, Columbia  University; JSD candidate, Stanford University) is a professor of law at Universidad de San Andrés and visiting researcher at CEDES. Her interests include feminist critiques of the law, socio-legal theory, and research on constitutional and human rights issues. Bergallo has taught at Universidad de Palermo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Universidad de Puerto Rico, and Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México.

Sandra Botero

Sandra Botero (MA in Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin and PhD candidate, University of Notre Dame) is a Kellogg Institute PhD fellow. Her research interests include comparative judicial politics, courts in new democracies, conceptualization and measurement. In her dissertation, she is studying the policy impact of high-court decisions on socioeconomic rights in Latin America. She is also a research assistant for the Varieties of Democracy project.

Daniel Brinks 

Daniel Brinks (PhD, University of Notre Dame; JD, University of Michigan) is associate professor of political science at the University of Texas at Austin and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. His research focuses on the role of the law and courts in supporting or extending the rights associated with democracy and constitutional rights more broadly, especially in Latin America. His books include The Judicial Response to Police Violence in Latin America: Inequality and the Rule of Law (2007) and Courting Social Justice (coedited, 2008), both from Cambridge University Press.

Isidoro Cheresky 

Isidoro Cheresky (PhD, Université de Toulouse–Le Mirail) is professor of contemporary political theory at Universidad de Buenos Aires and principal investigator at CONICET. Among his recent projects is “Las democracias contemporáneas y la relegitimación permanente del poder: elecciones, ciudadanía, partidos políticos y nuevos liderazgos.” His numerous publications include Poder presidencial, opinión pública y exclusión social (CLACSO-Manantial, 2008), Ciudadanía y democracia continua (CLACSO-Prometeo, 2011), and La política después de los partidos (ed., Prometeo, 2006). Cheresky is a consultant on democratic governance for the Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD). A former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow, he has taught at many national and international universities.

David Collier

David Collier (PhD, University of Chicago) is Chancellor’s Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. He has written extensively on democracy, authoritarianism, regime dynamics, and long-term trajectories of political change, and has published extensive methodological work on conceptualization, measurement, and causal assessment. His major books include The New Authoritarianism in Latin America (Princeton University Press, 1979); Shaping the Political Arena: Critical Junctures, the Labor Movement, and Regime Dynamics in Latin America (with Ruth Berins Collier, Princeton University Press 1991/University of Notre Dame Press, 2002); and Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools, Shared Standards (with Henry E. Brady, 2nd ed., Rowman and Littlefield, 2010).

Michael Coppedge

Michael Coppedge (PhD, Yale University) is professor of political science and a Kellogg Institute faculty fellow at the University of Notre Dame. Coppedge chairs the American Political Science Association Task Force on Indicators of Democracy and Governance and is one of the principal investigators of the Varieties of Democracy project. He is the author of Democratization and Research Methods (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming) and with John Gerring et al.,“Conceptualizing and Measuring Democracy: A New Approach,” Perspectives on Politics 9, 2 (June 2011): 247–67.

Martín D’Alessandro

Martín D’Alessandro (PhD, Universidad de Buenos Aires) is professor of political science and researcher at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and at CONICET. His work focuses on political leadership, electoral campaigns and political parties. He is also editor of two Argentine political science journals: POSTData and Revista SAAP.

Miguel De Luca

Miguel De Luca (PhD, University of Florence) is professor of political science at the University of Buenos Aires, researcher at CONICET, and president of Sociedad Argentina de Análisis Político (SAAP). His main research interests are government institutions and processes, political parties, and local policy. His articles have been published in Comparative Political Studies and European Political Science. He recently coedited, with Andrés Malamud, La política en tiempos de los Kirchner (EUDEBA, 2011). 

Gustavo Dufour 

Gustavo Dufour (MA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid) is professor at Universidad Nacional Arturo Jauretche and at Universidad de Buenos Aires, where he is a member of the Department of Social Sciences. He also teaches graduate courses at various universities in Argentina and abroad. In addition, Dufour serves as consultant to the chief of Argentina’s Cabinet of Ministers. 

Robert M. Fishman

Robert M. Fishman (PhD, Yale University) is a Kellogg Institute faculty fellow and professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame. Fishman is currently writing a book that compares democratic practice and societal outcomes in Spain and Portugal. His most recent books are Democracy’s Voices (Cornell University Press, 2004) and, with Anthony Messina, The Year of the Euro (University of Notre Dame Press, 2006). His articles have appeared in World Politics, Politics and Society, Studies in Comparative International Development, Comparative Politics and other journals. 

Alberto Föhrig

Alberto Föhrig (PhD, University of Oxford) is professor of political science and researcher at Universidad de San Andrés. He is currently conducting research on political finance in Argentina. He has coauthored one book and numerous articles dealing with intra-party politics, provincial politics, and the evolution of the Argentine party system.

Carlos Gervasoni

Carlos Gervasoni (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is an assistant professor of political science at Universidad Torcuato Di Tella. Previously a Kellogg Institute PhD fellow, his recent research focuses on measuring and explaining subnational democracy in Argentina. He is also collaborating on the Varieties of Democracy Project, an international effort to produce new indicators of democracy. His articles have appeared in América Latina Hoy, Comparative Political Studies, Democratization, Journal of Democracy en Español, Journal of Politics in Latin America, and World Politics. 

José María Ghio 

José María Ghio (PhD, Columbia University) is associate director at Poliarquia Consultores and professor in the Department of Political Science at Universidad Torcuato Di Tella. Ghio was a founder and provost of the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella and the executive director of Fundación PENT. Country manager for the Southern Cone Group in Buenos Aires, he has also done work for the World Bank. He is a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. 

Lucas González 

Lucas González (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is professor and researcher at Universidad Nacional de San Martín, researcher at Universidad Católica Argentina, and lecturer at Universidad de San Andrés. A former Kellogg PhD fellow, he studied with Guillermo O’Donnell, who was his dissertation advisor. He has coauthored two books and numbers of articles, most recently in The Journal of Politics, Latin American Research Review, and Publius: The Journal of Federalism.

Evelyne Huber

Evelyne Huber (PhD, Yale University) is Morehead Alumni Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow, and president-elect of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA). She is author or coauthor of multiple books, including Capitalist Development and Democracy (with Dietrich Rueschemeyer and John D. Stephens, University of Chicago Press, 1992) and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (with John D. Stephens, University of Chicago Press, forthcoming).

Terry Lynn Karl

Terry Lynn Karl (PhD, Stanford University) is the Gildred Professor of Political Science and Latin American Studies at Stanford University. Her research focuses on the politics of oil-exporting countries, transitions to democracy, inequality, human rights, US foreign policy towards Latin America, and the resolution of civil wars. Her most recent publications include Globalization, Democratization and Inequality (with Philippe Schmitter, forthcoming) and Arabic and Farsi translations of The Paradox of Plenty: Oil Booms and Petro-States (University of California Press, 1998). An emeritus member of the Kellogg Institute Advisory Board, Karl is the 2010 recipient of the Latin American Studies/Oxfam Martin Diskin Prize for excellence in combining scholarship and activism.

David Lehmann 

David Lehmann (PhD, New College Oxford) teaches in the Department of Social Science at the University of Cambridge. His main works are Democracy and Development in Latin America: Economics, Politics and Religion in the Post War Period (Temple University Press, 1990), Struggle for the Spirit: Popular Culture and Religious Transformation in Brazil and Latin America (Polity Press, 1996), and Remaking Israeli Judaism (with Batia Siebzehner, Oxford University Press, 2006). Since 2007 he has also been working on evangelical religion and on multiculturalism and affirmative action policies in Brazil, Mexico, and Peru.

Marcelo Leiras

Marcelo Leiras (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is assistant professor in the Department of Social Sciences and director of undergraduate studies in political science and international relations at Universidad de San Andrés in Argentina, and researcher at CONICET. A former Kellogg PhD fellow, he has studied the determinants of party and party-system nationalization. His current work explores the causes and consequences of decentralized government and the effect of political competition on judicial stability. 

Steven Levitsky 

Steven Levitsky (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is professor of government at Harvard University and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. His work focuses on political regimes and regime change, parties and party change, as well as weak and informal institutions. Current book projects analyze the emergence and evolution of competitive authoritarian regimes in developing and post-communist countries and the rise of the left in contemporary Latin America. He is author of Transforming Labor-Based Parties in Latin America: Argentine Peronism in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge University Press, 2003).

Abraham F. Lowenthal

Abraham F. Lowenthal (PhD, Harvard University), professor emeritus of international relations at the University of Southern California, has combined two careers: as a scholar, teacher, adviser, and commentator on international relations—especially on Latin America and US–Latin America relations—and as an institution builder at the nexus of the worlds of ideas and policy, thought and action. He was the founding director of both the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Latin American Program and the Inter-American Dialogue and founding president of the Pacific Council on International Policy. The author of multiple books, edited volumes, and articles, he is an emeritus member of the Kellogg Advisory Board.

Scott Mainwaring

Scott Mainwaring (PhD, Stanford University) is the Eugene and Helen Conley Professor of Political Science and the director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame. His research interests include democratic institutions and democratization; political parties and party systems; and the Catholic Church in Latin America. His latest book, with Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, isThe Rise and Fall of Democracies and Dictatorships: Latin America since 1900 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).

Sebastian Mazzuca

Sebastian Mazzuca (PhD candidate, University of California, Berkeley) is a lecturer in the department of government at Harvard University, where he has also been a fellow at the Academy for International and Area Studies. His work focuses on the origins and transformations of national states and political regimes, as well as on the political economy of development, and has appeared in Comparative Politics, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Studies in International Comparative Development.

James McGuire 

James McGuire (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is professor and chair in the department of government at Wesleyan University and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. He is the author of Peronism without Perón (Stanford University Press, 1997) and of Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2010), and the translator of Guillermo O'Donnell's Bureaucratic Authoritarianism: Argentina, 1966–1973, in Comparative Perspective (University of California Press, 1988). 

Gerardo Munck

Gerardo Munck (PhD, University of California San Diego) is a professor in the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. His research focuses on democracy, methodology, and Latin America. His latest books include Measuring Democracy: A Bridge Between Scholarship and Politics (Johns Hopkins University, 2009); Regimes and Democracy in Latin America (Oxford University Press, 2007); and Passion, Craft, and Method in Comparative Politics (with Richard Snyder, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007). 

María Victoria Murillo

María Victoria Murillo (PhD, Harvard University) is a professor of political science and international affairs at Columbia University. Focusing on Latin America, her research includes work on distributive politics and political parties. Among her publications are Labor Unions, Partisan Coalitions, and Market Reforms in Latin America (2001) and Political Competition, Partisanship, and Policymaking in the Reform of Latin American Public Utilities (2009), both from Cambridge University Press, and numerous articles in US and Latin American journals.

María Matilde Ollier 

María Matilde Ollier (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is dean of the School of Politics and Government at Universidad Nacional de San Martín, where she is also professor. Her most recent books include Liderazgo, ciudadanía y gobierno local. El caso del Partido de General San Martín(ed., UNSAM Edita, forthcoming) and Atrapada sin salida. La imbricación de Buenos Aires en la política nacional (1916–2007) (UNSAM Edita, 2010).

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is associate professor of political science and member of the core faculty at the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh as well as a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. His research focuses on constitutional design, political stability, and institutional performance among new democracies. He is the author of Presidential Impeachment and the New Political Instability in Latin America (Cambridge, 2007) as well as a forthcoming book with Scott Mainwaring on democracy and dictatorships in Latin America.

Enrique Peruzzotti

Enrique Peruzzotti (PhD, New School for Social Research) is an associate professor in the department of political science at the University Torcuato Di Tella and a researcher at CONICET. He has published extensively on civil society politics and democratization in Latin America. Among his coedited works is Participatory Innovation and Representative Democracy in Latin America (John Hopkins University Press, 2009) and Democracy and Critical Theory: Civil Society, Dictatorship, and Constitutionalism in Andrew Arato's Democratic Theory (Routledge, forthcoming). 

Timothy J. Power 

Timothy J. Power (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is director of the Latin American Centre and a fellow of St. Cross College at the University of Oxford. A former president of the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) as well as a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow, he conducts research on political institutions and democratization in Latin America. His most recent book is Corruption and Democracy in Brazil: The Struggle for Accountability (coedited with Matthew M. Taylor, University of Notre Dame Press, 2011).

Philippe Schmitter

Philippe Schmitter (PhD, University of California Berkeley) is emeritus professor of political science at the European University Institute. He has held positions at the University of Chicago and Stanford University as well as many visiting posts. He has published widely on comparative politics, regional integration, transitions from authoritarian rule, and the intermediation of class, sectoral, and professional interests. His current work focuses on the emerging Euro-polity, democracy consolidation, and the possibility of postliberal democracy. With Guillermo O’Donnell, he wrote Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies, Vol. IV in the series he coedited with O’Donnell and Laurence Whitehead (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986).

Timothy R. Scully, CSC

Timothy R. Scully, CSC
(PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is professor of political science, director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives, and a Kellogg Institute faculty fellow at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on comparative political institutions, especially political parties, and Latin American politics. His writings include Rethinking the Center: Party Politics in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Chile (Stanford University Press, 1992) and five coauthored volumes, including Creencias e ilusiones: La cohesion social de los Latinoamericanos (Uqbar Editores, 2008) and Democratic Governance in Latin America (Stanford University Press, 2009).

Ximena Simpson

Ximena Simpson (PhD, Universidade do Estado de Río de Janeiro) is professor and researcher in the School of Politics and Government at Universidad Nacional de San Martín. Her research centers on comparative analysis of Latin American federal systems and their political and economic development, with a primary focus on Brazil and Argentina. 

Catalina Smulovitz

Catalina Smulovitz (PhD, Pennsylvania State University) is chair of the Department of Political Science and International Studies at Universidad Torcuato Di Tella and researcher at CONICET. Smulovitz’s research has focused on the politics of human rights, social accountability, and the use of law in Latin America. She is currently investigating inequality in the protection of rights at the subnational level. 

Alfred Stepan

Alfred Stepan (PhD, Columbia University) is Wallace Sayre Professor of Government, the founding director of the Center for the Study of Democracy, Toleration, and Religion, and the codirector of the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life at Columbia University. His research interests include comparative politics, theories of democratic transitions, federalism, and the world’s religious systems and democracy. The most recent of his many influential books is Crafting State-Nations: India and Other Multinational Democracies (with Juan J. Linz and Yogendra Yadev, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011). A former Kellogg Institute guest scholar, Stepan also served on the Institute’s Advisory Board.

M. Gloria Trocello

M. Gloria Trocello (PhD, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Spain) is professor of law and politics in the Department of Economic and Social Sciences at Universidad Nacional de San Luis in Argentina. Her research has focused on the political culture of Argentina’s subnational regimes. Among her books and articles is La manufactura de ciudadanos siervo: cultura política y regímenes neopatrimonialistas (Nueva Editorial Universitaria, 2009). She has been a visiting professor at universities in Argentina and Spain.

Luis Tonelli

Luis Tonelli (Licenciado en Ciencia Política, USAL 1987) is chair of the Department of Political Science and professor of institutional analysis at Universidad de Buenos Aires. He is associate director of Mora y Araujo Comunicación Institucional and steering member and political columnist for Revista Debate. Tonelli has served as director general of strategic planning for the President’s Office in Argentina.

Jorge Vargas Cullell

Jorge Vargas Cullell (PhD, University of Notre Dame) is director of the Programa Estado de la Nación in Costa Rica and a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. His research focuses on democratization in Central America, the quality of democracy in Costa Rica, and citizen attitudes in Latin America. A consultant for UNDP, IADB, SIDA, and USAID among other organizations, he has overseen the preparation of numerous Costa Rican State of the Nation reports and Central American Human Development reports. With Guillermo O’Donnell and Osvaldo Iazzetta, he coedited The Quality of Democracy: Theory and Applications (University of Notre Dame Press, 2004).

Eduardo Viola

Eduardo Viola (PhD, Universidade de São Paulo) is professor of international relations at University of Brasilia and coordinator of the Brazilian Research Network on International Relations and Climate Change. He has published on issues of globalization and governance, democracy and democratization in South America, and the global and South American politics of climate change. Viola has been visiting professor at several international universities, including the University of Colorado Boulder, University of Amsterdam, and Stanford University. He is a former Kellogg Institute visiting fellow. 

Francisco Correa Weffort 

Francisco Correa Weffort (PhD, Universidade de São Paulo), professor emeritus in the Department of Political Science at the University of São Paulo, is currently professor at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Weffort was a researcher with CEBRAP and CEDEC in Brazil, and with CEPAL in Chile. He served as minister of culture in the government of Fernando Henrique Cardoso (1995–2002). Weffort was a Kellogg Institute visiting fellow and served as a member of the Institute’s Advisory Board. 

Laurence Whitehead

Laurence Whitehead (MA, Oxford University) is official fellow in politics and senior fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford University, and senior proctor of the University. His most recent book is Latin America: A New Interpretation (Palgrave, 2nd ed., revised and updated, 2010). He serves as editor of the Oxford University Press series “Studies in Democratization,” president of the Conseil Scientifique of the Institut des Ameriques in Paris, and a member of the steering committee of the Euro-Latin American Network about Governability for Development. With Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, he edited Transitions from Authoritarian Rule (vol. 1–4, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986). 

Rodrigo Zarazaga SJ

Rodrigo Zarazaga SJ (PhD, University of California, Berkeley) is director of CIAS (Centro de Investigación y Acción Social), a Jesuit research center in Argentina. His research interests include Latin American democracies, party machines, clientelism, and social policy. He will be a Kellogg Institute visiting fellow in fall 2012.

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