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Kellogg Institute International Development Fellowships

Recipients

2015

Megan FuerstMegan Fuerst, a pre-professional studies major with minors in anthropology and peace studies, has spent two summers in rural Uganda immersing herself in women's and children’s health issues. Dedicated to improving maternal healthcare in vulnerable populations, she plans to become an OB/GYN and has deferred medical school for a year to undertake this fellowship.

As a Kellogg Summer Intern, Megan worked in Uganda with the Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children and the next year, funded by a Kellogg/Kroc Undergraduate Research Grant, returned to conduct independent fieldwork on barriers to accessing maternal healthcare. The research formed the basis for two conference presentations as well as a senior thesis in anthropology supervised by Faculty Fellow Vania Smith-Oka.

A science student with 3 1/2 years of experience in the biochemistry lab, Megan was drawn to her minors by their emphasis on interactions with people and connections to a wider community. Her work is informed by Catholic social teaching.

As an International Development Fellow, Megan will work with VSO’s Africa fundraising team, responding to funding opportunities and participating on proposal bids. Based in Pretoria, South Africa, the position involves research, proposal development, special initiatives, and travel to country offices in the region.

VSO is the world’s leading independent international development organization that works through volunteers to build community resilience and active citizenship. Its high-impact approach involves bringing people together to share skills, build capacity of local and existing structures, innovate and promote international understanding and action. VSO utilizes a range of skilled professionals, 30% of whom are from the Global South, within signature VSO projects. VSO is well positioned to leverage resources (financial and human) to promote sustainable social and economic development.


Matthew HingMatthew Hing, a Spanish and Arts & Letters pre-health studies major and peace studies minor, is focused on reducing inequalities in healthcare quality and access throughout the world. “Quality healthcare is a cornerstone in development and a human right,” he says. He plans to attend medical school after the fellowship and devote his career to global health.

A Glynn Family Honors Scholar, Matthew studied abroad in Puebla, Mexico, where he shadowed local physicians in a government HIV/AIDS clinic. In Nicaragua on a Kellogg Summer Internship with the Foundation for Sustainable Development, he next worked with staff at another government clinic to design and implement a community health–worker training program to improve reproductive health services in rural areas.

He later returned to Nicaragua on a Glynn Family Thesis Research Grant to conduct field research on the role of Nicaraguan health workers in mitigating domestic violence. He presented his findings at Notre Dame’s annual Human Development Conference and incorporated them into an award-winning senior thesis.

As an International Development Fellow, Hing will serve as a community health programs assistant for Compañeros En Salud/Partners in Health in Chiapas, Mexico. He will supervise and manage the Acompañante program, which seeks to achieve better outcomes among people living with chronic disease by training community members to “accompany” patients in their ongoing care.

Compañeros En Salud is an affiliate of Partners In Health in Chiapas, Mexico.  The organization’s mission is to build a primary health care model of excellence in rural Mexico.


Emily MediateEmily Mediate, an Africana studies and pre-health studies major, is a Kellogg International Scholar and International Development Studies (IDS) minor who has focused her undergraduate years on bringing together varied approaches to international development and, specifically, the treatment of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

Emily’s personal and professional goals come together in her integration of Catholic social teaching’s conception of human dignity into policy approaches to international development. With a career goal of improving health-based foreign aid, Emily intends to pursue a master’s in evidence-based social intervention and policy evaluation at the University of Oxford at the conclusion of her fellowship.

As an International Scholar, Emily worked with Faculty Fellow Terence McDonnell to analyze USAID HIV/AIDS campaigns. She also conducted independent research in Uganda, most especially on the role of foreign funding and personnel in the country’s HIV/AIDS epidemic. The fieldwork was the basis for her Africana studies senior thesis as well as her IDS capstone essay. 

The recipient of a Kellogg/Kroc Undergraduate Research Grant as well as other funding, Emily studied abroad in London, where she was a policy and advocacy intern with Save the Children, UK. She has worked weekly with Imani Unidad, a South Bend support group for women with HIV, learning that “HIV is so much more than a medical issue.” She also continues her relationship with the Palliative Care Association of Uganda, where she was a Kellogg Summer Intern in 2013, planning to make the organization the focus of her master’s thesis.

As an International Development Fellow with AVSI in Kampala, Uganda, Emily will conduct research to evaluate a multi-faceted USAID-funded program that aims to improve the well-being of children in HIV-affected families. This year’s focus is on how economic strengthening can improve outcomes.

The Association of Volunteers in International Service (AVSI) is an international not-for-profit, non-governmental organization founded in Italy in 1972. AVSI’s mission is to support human development in developing countries with special attention to education and the promotion of the dignity of every human person, according to Catholic social teaching. At present, AVSI is operating in 38 countries of Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Asia with over 130 long-term projects and relief operations directly benefiting around 4,000,000 people in various sectors. Highly qualified AVSI personnel are directly involved in long-term field assignments together with hundreds of locally hired people and supported by dozens of academics and senior practitioners.

Read more: International Scholar Advocates New Paradigm for HIV/AIDS Treatment


Chris NewtonChris Newton, a political science major and International Development Studies (IDS) minor, has immersed himself in international affairs and development at Notre Dame, conducting research and fieldwork in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Russia. He hopes to establish a career in monitoring and evaluation and evidence-based interventions, especially in conflict and post-conflict countries.

In Rwanda, Chris investigated the country’s regional foreign policy including its relationship with the Democratic Republic of the Congo on an Experiencing the World Fellowship, resulting in his IDS capstone essay. In Nepal, with a Kellogg/Kroc Undergraduate Research Grant, he conducted research on the fragmentation of a former Maoist rebel group for his political science honors thesis, which won the Stephen Kertesz Prize for the best senior thesis in the field of international relations.

Chris cochaired the 2015 Human Development Conference hosted by the Institute’s Ford Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity. He helped to found the campus chapter of Global Zero, winning a Nanovic Research Grant for a joint student project to study variation in think tank views on nuclear weapons.

During a semester abroad in Jerusalem, Israel-Palestine, he interned with Catholic Relief Services. He also held research assistantships each year with various members of the political science faculty and served as an associate editor for Cornell’s The Diplomacist.

As an International Development Fellow, Chris will join the AVSI staff in Juba supporting project implementation in particular in the areas of monitoring and evaluation, proposal design, and building relationships with donor and NGO community. He will be based in Juba, South Sudan.


Laura ZillmerLaura Zillmer, a political science major and peace studies minor, has a particular interest in promoting development through policy. She sees the fellowship as the first in several international experiences in development, to be followed by a master’s in public policy and, she hopes, a career with USAID or the United Nations.

After studying abroad in London for a semester, Laura taught English at a rural school in Kitete, Tanzania for nine weeks through the International Summer Service Learning Program of the Center for Social Concerns.

Her experience led her to further investigate humanitarian intervention, and she wrote her senior thesis on the responsibility to protect in international law, particularly in instances of grave human rights abuses. She sees strengthening human rights norms as fundamental to human development work.

Laura has served as African Regional Committee chair for Notre Dame’s International Development Research Council and as an intern for Catholic Charities of Lake County in Illinois.

As an International Development Fellow, Laura will work with VSO’s Africa fundraising team, responding to funding opportunities and participating on proposal bids. Based in Pretoria, South Africa, the position involves research, proposal development, special initiatives, and travel to country offices in the region.

VSO is the world’s leading independent international development organization that works through volunteers to build community resilience and active citizenship. Its high-impact approach involves bringing people together to share skills, build capacity of local and existing structures, innovate, and promote international understanding and action. VSO utilizes a range of skilled professionals, 30% of whom are from the Global South, within signature VSO projects. VSO is well positioned to leverage resources (financial and human) to promote sustainable social and economic development.


2014

Olivia Schneider

Olivia Schneider, a political science major with minors in business economics and international development studies (IDS), spent a semester studying international development in Uganda and stayed in country to volunteer for the summer with the nonprofit Raising Up Hope for Uganda. During her time in Uganda, she conducted fieldwork to compare the welfare of orphans, vulnerable community children, and street children. This research formed the basis of her IDS capstone, “Uganda’s Street Children: Investigating the Challenges of Street Life and Effectiveness of Phased Rehabilitation Models.” She presented her findings at the 2014 Human Development Conference, where she also served as a member of the student organizing committee.

As an International Development Fellow, Schneider will work in Uganda with the Association of Volunteers in International Service (AVSI), an NGO that supports human development with special attention to Catholic social teaching in 38 countries around the globe. Schneider will help to implement the USAID-funded SCORE project, which aims to improve the well-being of critically vulnerable children and their families by increasing household income, food security, and access to legal services. This partnership builds on the Kellogg Institute’s work with AVSI on a major initiative to understand the role of human dignity in development.


Patrick SalemmePatrick Salemme, an anthropology and pre-health studies major studied abroad during his junior year in Puebla, Mexico, where he used his fluent Spanish to shadow Mexican physicians and learn about the Mexican healthcare system. In summer 2013, he spent 10 weeks working in rural clinics and organizing medical campaigns with VivePerú on a Kellogg summer internship. With plans to make assisting communities develop sustainable healthcare systems his career, Salemme will attend medical school following his year in Mexico.

As an International Development Fellow, Salemme will join Partners In Health (PIH), which works around the world to provide a preferential option for the poor in health care. He will work with PIH affiliate Compañeros En Salud, which is building a primary health care model of excellence in rural Chiapas, Mexico, to assist with a community health worker research study. This fellowship builds on the Kellogg Institute’s close ties to Partners in Health, which was the 2011 recipient of the Notre Dame Award for International Human Development and Solidarity.


Kellogg Launches International Development Fellowships with Awards to Graduating Seniors (more...)


 

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