Keough
University of Notre Dame
Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute Hesburgh Center/Kellogg Institute

International Conference on Archbishop Oscar Romero

University of Notre Dame • September 25 - 27, 2014

Conference Schedule

All events take place in the Hesburgh Center Auditorium (overflow, C103 Hesburgh) unless otherwise noted.

Thursday, September 25

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Registration - Great Hall, Hesburgh Center

9:00 am

Mass in Spanish (optional) -- Alumni Chapel Hall
Presiding: TBD

4:00 pm - 4:15 pm

Welcome
Rev. Robert S. Pelton, CSC, Director, Latin American/North American Church Concerns

4:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Keynote Address I: “Pope Francis and the Preferential Option for the Poor”
Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez, OP, John Cardinal O’Hara Professor of Theology, University of Notre Dame

Introduction by:
Matthew Ashley, Chair, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Q & A

5:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Commentary: “Archbishop Romero and the Preferential Option for the Poor
Rev. Carlos Sánchez, Pastor, First Baptist Church, San Salvador

7:00 pm - 9:30 pm

Dinner Reception (registered participants only)


Friday, September 26, 2014

9:00 am

Mass in English (optional) -- Alumni Chapel Hall
Presiding: Rev. Matthew Kuczora, CSC

9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Registration - Great Hall, Hesburgh Center

10:00 am - 11:30 am

Distinguished Lecture - “Monseñor Romero Remembered in Perquín, El Salvador”
Claudia Bernardi, Professor of Community Arts, California College of the Arts

Introduction by:
Rev. Patrick Gaffney, CSC, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame

12:00 - 1:00 pm

Lunch (registered participants only)

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Special Sessions

Session 1: “Romero as a Person and His Charisma with the Pontiffs”

Presenter:
Julian Filochowski, Chair, Archbishop Romero Trust, United Kingdom

Respondent:
James Creagan, Professor of International Studies, University of the Incarnate Word

Chair:
Rev. Virgilio Elizondo, Professor of Pastoral and Hispanic Theology, University of Notre Dame

2:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Break

2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Session 2: “The Legal Aid and Human Rights Heritage of Óscar Romero”

Presenter:
Roberto Cuéllar, Regional Director for Central America, Human Rights Education Institute, Organization of Ibero-American States

Introduction by:
Christine Cervenak, Associate Director, Center for Civil and Human Rights, University of Notre Dame

Respondent:
Tom Quigley, Former Foreign Policy Advisor, Latin America and the Caribbean, US Conference of Catholic Bishops

3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Free Time

5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Keynote Address 2: “The Spirituality of Monseñor Romero”
Monsignor Ricardo Urioste,
President, Fundación Monseñor Romero

Introduction by:
Rev. Robert S. Pelton, CSC, Director, Latin American/North American Church Concerns, University of Notre Dame

Respondent:
Sr. Pat Farrell, OSF, Former President, Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR)

6:30 pm

Welcome Reception & Tribute to Rev. Edward L. Cleary, OP
Location: Notre Dame Center for Arts & Culture, 1045 W. Washington Street, South Bend, IN 46601

Hosted by
Gilberto Cárdenas, Executive Director, Notre Dame Center for Arts & Culture


Saturday, September 27, 2014

9:00 am - 2:15 pm

Panel Sessions— Conversion of Romero
Location: Andrews Auditorium, Geddes Hall

9:00 am

Welcome
Rachel Tomas Morgan, Director of International Service Learning, Center for Social Concerns, University of Notre Dame

9:00 am - 10:15 am

Panel 1: Psychological Conversion

Discussant:
Damian Zynda, Faculty, Christian Spirituality Program, Creighton University

Respondents:
Rev. David Perrin, OMI, Professor, Department of Religious Studies, St. Jerome's University
Mauro Pando, Former Director of the Counseling Ministry, Franciscan Renewal Center

Chair:
Rachel Tomas Morgan, Director of International Service Learning, Center for Social Concerns

10:15 am - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 am - 11:15 am

Panel 2: Social Teaching Conversion

Discussant:
Margaret Pfeil, Associate Professional Specialist in Theology, University of Notre Dame

Respondent:
Rev. Michael Connors, CSC, Associate Professional Specialist in Theology, University of Notre Dame

Chair:
Rachel Tomas Morgan, Director of International Service Learning, Center for Social Concerns

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Lunch
Hesburgh Center Courtyard

1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Panel 3: Theological/Pastoral Conversion

Discussant:
Thomas M. Kelly, Professor of Systematic Theology, Creighton University

Respondent:
Sr. Ana María Pineda, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Santa Clara University

Chair:
Victor Maqque, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Notre Dame

2:15 pm - 2:30 pm

Break

2:30 pm - 3:45 pm

Keynote Address 3: “Monseñor Romero: Martyr of Solidarity”
Michael E. Lee, Associate Professor of Theology, Fordham University

Introduction by:
Matthew Ashley, Chair, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame

Respondent:
Robert Ellsberg, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher, Orbis Books

3:45 pm - 4:45 pm

Tribute to Rev. Dean Brackley, SJ

Gene Palumbo, Journalist and Teacher

Guadalupe Montalvo, Casa de la Solidaridad, El Salvador

5:00 pm

Misa Salvadoreña
Hesburgh Center Lawn

Presiding:
Most Rev. Ricardo Ramírez, CSB, Bishop Emeritus of Las Cruces

Homilist:
Rev. John Keefe, CSC

With: The Church of Loretto Choir
Directed by Barbara Ziliak, Former Liturgy Director, Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross

Closing Celebration and Picnic (promptly after Mass)

Hesburgh Center Lawn


 

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