Ford

HDC

Transforming Development:
New Actors, Innovative Technologies
& Emerging Trends

February 28 - March 1, 2014
All events to take place in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies unless otherwise noted

Conference Schedule

Friday, February 28

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm Presenter Registration

2:30 pm – Opening Remarks

3:15 – 4:45 pm Panel Session 1

Panel A - On the Outside: Understanding Discrimination (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)
Panel B - The Effects of Internal Conflicts and Resolutions in Development (C103 Hesburgh Center)

5:00 – 6:30 pm Panel Session 2

Panel A - Empowering Youth to Promote Development (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)
Panel B - Healthcare and Health Policies: Putting the ‘Care’ in Healthcare (C103 Hesburgh Center)   
Panel C - Natural Resources in the Developing World: Does Extraction Help or Hinder Development?
(C102 Hesburgh Center)

6:30 pm – Casual Dinner

7:00 pm – Documentary Screening: When China Met Africa

Saturday, March 1

9:30 – 10:30 am Coffee and Light Breakfast

10:30 am – 12:00 pm Panel Session 3

Panel A - The Business of Agriculture (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)
Panel B - Green Development: Environmental Sustainability (C103 Hesburgh Center)
Panel C - Tourism: Economic Revitalization or Ruin? (C102 Hesburgh Center)
Panel D - The Power of Language (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

12:00 – Lunch

1:00 – 2:15 pm Poster Presentations

2:30 – 4:00 pm Panel Session 4

Panel A - Education and Empowerment (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)
Panel B - Development Trends in the Developed World (C103 Hesburgh Center)
Panel C - The Changing Field of Agriculture (C102 Hesburgh Center)
Panel D - Resource Instability and Human Well Being (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

4:15 – 5:45 pm Panel Session 5

Panel A - More Than Good Intentions: Improving Outcomes and Dealing with Unintended Consequences (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)
Panel B - Confronting Gender Issues (C103 Hesburgh Center)
Panel C - Partnership and Participation: Solidarity Initiatives in Development (C102 Hesburgh Center)
Panel D - Identities New and Old (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

6:30 pm – Closing Dinner
Keynote Speech: Mireille Cronin Mather
Executive Director, Foundation for Sustainable Development

Panel Descriptions

Friday

Session 1 – 3:15 – 4:45 pm        

Panel A – On the Outside: Understanding Discrimination (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)

Understanding how and why discrimination operates in a society is crucial to finding a solution of inclusion. This panel explores different forms of discrimination and proposes solutions to decrease disparities in a society.

Alexandra Blackwell (George Washington University) - Between Religious Refusal and Sexual Health: Improving Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Status in the Islamic Maghreb

Kaitlin Thompson (Villanova University) - The Gender Wage Gap: The Situation and Factors That Influence the Gender Wage Gap in High-Earning Positions in Chile

Katy Lindquist (Colby College) - Outside of Vision 2020: Exclusion and Resistance in Rwanda’s Urban Development Programs

Ryan Fish (University of Notre Dame) - Assessing Employment Potential of Dalit Women in the Jodhpuri Service Industry

Moderator
Mireille Cronin Mather
Executive Director
Foundation for Sustainable Development (FSD)

Panel B – The Effects of Internal Conflicts and Resolutions on Development (C103 Hesburgh Center)

What strategies do governments use to combat powerful criminal organizations threatening state collapse? How do states reorient and identify themselves in post-conflict settings? How should post-conflict societies manage the return home of displaced populations? This set of panelists examines each of these questions and offers possible policy implications of their research.

Madison Stevens (Franklin College Switzerland) - Lara Ngom ii Acoli: Identifying Root Causes and Impacts of Cultural Cataclysm on Land Conflict Resolution in Nwoya District, Northern Uganda

Magdalena Guzman (University of Notre Dame) - How Globalization, Democracy, and Decentralization Encouraged the Rise of the Zetas in Mexico

Rocio Rodriguez (Texas Tech University) - (Re)Integration of Women Post Human (Sex) Trafficking

Moderator
Jimena Holguín, M.A.
Program Manager of the International Summer Service Learning Program and Community-Based Research
Center for Social Concerns

Session 2 – 5:00 – 6:30 pm

Panel A – Empowering Youth to Promote Development (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)

The personal growth of children and young adults depends upon education, a healthy home environment, positive role models, employment opportunities, and countless other factors which are often unavailable to those growing up in impoverished and war-ravaged countries. This panel examines several structural challenges impeding youth empowerment, as well as possible approaches to promoting the next generation’s true potential.

Olivia Schneider (University of Notre Dame) - Uganda’s Street Children: Investigating the Challenges of Street Life and Effectiveness of Phased Rehabilitation Models

Kristen Hochreiter (University of Pittsburgh) - Effective and Sustainable Programs of Change: A Case Study of Gulu Women’s Economic Development and Globalization (GWED-G)

Mariam Adil (George Washington University) - Innovative Use of SMS Technology for Tracking Labor-Market Outcomes of Sindh Skills Development Project Trainee

Moderator
Keiko Pinces
International Programs Officer – East Africa & India
Foundation for Sustainable Development

Panel B — Healthcare and Health Policies: Putting the ‘Care’ in Healthcare (C103 Hesburgh Center)

Improving healthcare and health policies is crucial to development because the outcomes tend to improve nations' productivity, mortality rates, possible investment opportunities, and many other areas. Health is an indispensable requirement for economic growth and human well-being, and this panel will discuss specific health questions specifically targeted to improve the overall conditions in developing nations.

Megan Fuerst (University of Notre Dame) - Counterfeit Anti-Malarial Drugs Propagates Malaria Crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa

Samuel Wein (Washington University in St. Louis) - What Makes the Cut? Cultural Narratives of Circumcision: An Autoethnography of Silence, Militarization, and Impact

Moderator
Lacey Haussamen, M.P.H.
Assistant Director of Global Health Training
Eck Institute for Global Health
University of Notre Dame

Panel C – Natural Resources in the Developing World: Does Extraction Help or Hinder Development? (C102 Hesburgh Center)

Developing nations often see natural resource extraction as a driver of economic growth. However, mining and drilling can create conflict between corporate, political, and local stakeholders. This panel explores how societies navigate these challenges.

D. Alex Wood (University of Notre Dame) - Mining, Protest and the Future: A Study of the Effects of the 2011 Protests on Mining in Puno Peru

Gabriela Polo (DePaul University) - ‘Sumak kawsay’ and the Ecuadorian Yasuní-ITT Initiative: A Pathway to a More Inclusive, Sustainable, and Just Development Model

Sarah Meyerhoff (Williams College) - Development or Discord? Oil, Ethnicity, and Politics in Uganda's Albertine-Graeben

Moderator
Amitava Krishna Dutt, Ph.D.
Professor of Economics and Political Science
Kellogg Faculty Fellow
Director, International Development Studies Minor
University of Notre Dame

Saturday

Session 3 – 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Panel A – The Business of Agriculture (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)

Recognizing the necessary synthesis between business management and agriculture is crucial to development. This panel discusses business administration and execution strategy as it pertains to agricultural development in developing countries.
                
Roland Perkins (University of Notre Dame) - A Grinding Mill for Nnindye, Uganda

Prosper Niwagaba (Uganda Martyrs University) - Management and Use of Funds from Sales and Proceeds from the Community Banana Gardens in Nnindye Parish

Michelle Velez (Villanova University) - The Process of Organic Certification in Cerro Punta, Panama: How to Promote Sustainable Changes

Moderator
Francis Ssekijjo, M.A
.
Project Manager
Nkozi Agri-Business Training Association Credit and Finance Facilitator
Uganda Martyrs University UPFORD Program

Panel B – Green Development: Environmental Sustainability (C103 Hesburgh Center)

Policies that promote resource efficiency, such as those that delineate ‘green’ building practices, are important for reducing the amount of energy expended in addition to other natural resources. This panel will discuss how the incorporation of ‘green’ policies is potentially beneficial for developing countries if implemented correctly.
 
Sam Schelfhout (University of Portland) - The Emergence of "Green" Architecture in South Africa

Kevin Fink (University of Notre Dame) - Assessment of the Seismic Resiliency of Housing Models in Quito, Ecuador

Megan Reineccius (University of Notre Dame) - Understanding the Role of the Built Environment in Tanzania

Joe Thwaites (American University) - Pakistan’s Shifting Discourse on Climate Change at the United Nations Security Council

Moderator
Samir Younés, M. Arch.
Professor of Architecture
University of Notre Dame

Panel C – Tourism: Economic Revitalization or Ruin? (C102 Hesburgh Center)

Tourism is becoming an increasingly popular means of economic and social development. However, some argue tourism hurts local development efforts and can compromise democratization. This panel deciphers the benefits and consequences of introducing tourism into the developing world.

Emily de Wet (Wheaton College) - Racialized Paths and the Business of South African Township Tourism

Jasper Peet-Martel (Macalester College) - Deceptive Development and Democratization: Stadium Construction and Securitization in the FIFA World Cup Host Countries of South Africa and Brazil

Julia Benedith (Wesleyan University) - “Una realidad compleja”: How “Ship Out” Has Influenced the Relationships and the Aspirations of Bluefields’s Youth

Panel D – The Power of Language (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

Native or indigenous languages can often play a crucial role in cultural development, yet this may conflict with a view of development that sees modernization or globalization as an end goal. This panel will discuss how language relates to development as a facet of unification, education, or cultural preservation.

Samantha Murphy (Josef Korbel School for International Studies, University of Denver) - Language in Uganda: Implications for Security and Democracy

Megan Olson (University of Notre Dame) - Perceptions of Foreign Language as a Tool for Development in Brazil

Moderator
Rev. Robert Dowd, CSC
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Director, Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity
University of Notre Dame

Poster Presentations, 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Mary Beliveau (Seton Hall University) - Eucalyptus Plantations: A Viable Solution to Deforestation in Madagascar

Mallory Bernstein (Muhlenberg College) - An Exploration of Diabetes Care in Durban, Kwa-Zulu Natal Suburbs as Seen Through the Work of Diabetes South Africa

Vierelina Fernández (DePaul University) - Imagining ALBA without Chávez: The End of South America’s Promise for Alternative Development?

Erik Jensen (University of Notre Dame) -Sustainable Housing in Post-Earthquake Haiti

Karla Jimenez (Columbia University) - Mozonteña Women: Land, Leadership, and Identity in the Pueblo Indígena de Mozonte, Nueva Segovia

Margeaux Prinster (University of Notre Dame) - Barriers to Empowerment: An Exploration of Gendered Space and Female Vocational Training in Jodhpur, India

Vijay N Sachdev (University of Redlands) - The Implications of Privileged Gay Politics on Queer Aberrations: Interrogating South Africa’s Nongovernmental Industrial Complex

Samuel Wein (Washington University in St. Louis) - What Makes the Cut? Cultural Narratives of Circumcision: An Autoethnography of Silence, Militarization, and Impact

Session 4 – 2:30 – 4:00 pm 

Panel A – Education and Empowerment (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)

Education is not merely the transfer of knowledge, but a foundation for development and change. This panel will explore the different realms of education, from health to business skills, as well as seek to understand the challenges education faces in today's world.

Catherine Gold (Hamilton College) - The Role of the Government of Chile in Health Education: An Issue of Empowerment

Gabrielle Arenge (Connecticut College) - Conceptualizing and Cultivating Creativity in Kibera, Kenya

Fiona Zawedde (Uganda Martyrs University) - Opportunities and Challenges of Teaching in a Rural Secondary School

Colleen Wade (University of Notre Dame) - The Development of a General Business Skills Training Program for Nnindye, Uganda

Panel B – Development Trends in the Developed World (C103 Hesburgh Center)

The goals and programs associated with development are not limited to developing countries. Wealthier nations are addressing topics such as food security, food systems, and education. This panel will examine development trends and efforts in these areas in the developed world.

Alyssa Tutterow (Washington University in St. Louis) - The Influence of Farmers’ Markets on Food Security: A Case Study of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

Aurora Myers (University of Portland) - Food Waste & Food Loss:  Working to Alleviate Inequities through Social Entrepreneurship & Advocacy

Elizabeth Millea (University of Notre Dame) - Pavee Point and Education in Ireland

Meg VanDeusen (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) - Cultivating Change: Women Transforming Holland’s Food System

Panel C – The Changing Field of Agriculture (C102 Hesburgh Center)

During a time of climate change and increased environmental awareness, agricultural practices must evolve to meet growing problems with sustainable solutions. This panel analyzes potential agricultural practices, policies, and solutions in the developing world.

Alexandra Guest (Skidmore College) - Agriculture in the Context of a Changing Climate: A survey of local producers on the Azuero peninsula

Greg Yungtum (University of Notre Dame) - Agricultural Land Use in Uganda

Chiman Debbarma (Holy Cross College, Agartala, India) - Shifting Cultivation, Jhum Cultivation, Primitive Culture, Indigenous Population, Jhumias

Moderator
Ben Efird, M.A.
University Relations Manager for the Midwest Region
SIT

Panel D – Resource Instability and Human Well-Being (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

Instability of resources such as food, water, and energy can affect the overall productivity of a country. Conflicts can arise between countries that are overusing shared natural resources. This panel will address the ways resource instability is affecting not only individuals but also the economies of developing countries.

Jesse Schaffer (George Washington University) - The Impact of Syrian Refugees on Socio-ecological Resilience and Community Tensions in the Northern Badia of Jordan

Marielle Velander (George Washington University) - Building Conceptual Bridges Over Troubled Waters:  Analysis and Sentiment Surrounding the Jordan River

Moderator
Erin Metz McDonnell, Ph.D.
Kellogg Assistant Professor of Sociology
University of Notre Dame

Session 5 – 4:15 – 5:45 pm

Panel A – More Than Good Intentions: Improving Outcomes and Dealing with Unintended Consequences (Hesburgh Center Auditorium)

Although development is intended to improve the lives of recipients, even the most well-meaning initiatives may fail to truly address their needs or may even create unintended negative consequences. This panel will provide insights on how to move beyond good intentions in order to bring about development with truly meaningful impact.

Lexi Doolittle (University of Richmond) - Homelessness, Violent Gangs and Trafficking: A Global Comparison of At-Risk Youth Organizations

Jingting Kang (University of Notre Dame) - International Volunteering:  Valuable or Vandalism

John Francis O’Halloran (University of Portland) - United States Foreign Aid to Syria: A Case Study

Moderator
Vania Smith-Oka, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Kellogg Faculty Fellow
University of Notre Dame

Panel B – Confronting Gender Issues (C103 Hesburgh Center)

Each country has its unique gender-related problems, ranging from inequality to discrimination to stereotypes and beyond. These kinds of problems inhibit developing countries' social and economic development by limiting job opportunities and highlighting hurtful expectations. This panel will address how developing nations are trying to solve gender-related issues while simultaneously fostering development.

Keavy McFadden (DePaul University) - Production and Pain: Development, Gender, and Female Bodies in the Salvadoran Garment Industry

Paul Rebman (Macalester College) - The Creation of the Hombre Nuevo: How Do Men in Nicaragua Confront Male Privilege and Gender Inequality?

Sanggeet Mithra Manirajah (Scripps College) - Are You Man Enough? A Look at the Attitudes of Young Male Professionals on Notions of Masculinity and Male Gender Norms in Modern India

Moderator
Joseph Wiltberger, Ph.D.
Cultural Anthropologist
Kellogg Visiting Fellow

Panel C – Partnership and Participation: Solidarity Initiatives in Development
(C102 Hesburgh Center)

Development can be generalized as improvements in social, economic, political, and humanitarian realms. However, developing nations cannot increase crucial factors such as life expectancy, literacy rates, and political stability entirely on their own. This panel will explore cases such as partnerships and local initiatives and their implications for particular countries’ development.

Denise Umubyeyi (University of Notre Dame) - New Partnerships in International Development: Implications for Rwandan Health Care

Genevieve Gill-Wiehl (University of Notre Dame) - Accompanying Accompagnateurs: Support Systems Among Community Health Workers in Lima, Peru

Lyndsey Czapansky (Hendrix College) - Problematizing Decentralization:  The Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Political Participation in Africa

Moderator
Steve Reifenberg, M.A.
Executive Director
Kellogg Institute for International Studies
University of Notre Dame

Panel D – Identities New and Old (C104/105 Hesburgh Center)

Identity shapes how individuals and groups approach and respond to development challenges. This panel will address how actors in the developing world are preserving old identities or creating new ones, while also maintaining a process of development.

Jesse Barlow (Bard College) - Poverty vs. Citizenship:  Identity and Nation-building through Rwanda’s Post-Genocide Development

John Gibbons (University of Notre Dame) - Ethnonationalism in Pune Politics: A Study of Maharashtra Navnirman Sena's Appeal in Pune, Maharashtra
 
Tate Ryan-Mosley (University of Notre Dame) - Grassroots Interactions and Social Trust in Rwanda Post-Genocide

Moderator
Fr. Emmanuel Kallarackal, CSC
Principal
Holy Cross College, Agartala


When China Met Africa

When China Met AfricaMarc Francis and Nick Francis (2010)

This film captures an extraordinary moment in time, following three characters working on the frontline of China's foray into Africa. Described by The Times as "a rare grassroots view into one of the most important economic challenges of our age," When China Met Africa reveals the expanding footprint of a rising global power. Set in Zambia, this captivating work from two award-winning filmmakers points to a radically different future, not just for Africa, but also for the world.