Discussions on Development Series

The Ford Program hosts the Discussions on Development series to encourage thoughtful discussion on the interdisciplinary nature of human development. Each discussion involves two to three Notre Dame professors from different disciplines to focus on a specific topic and its relation to development. All discussions are open to the public. Click on the titles to watch video of the discussions.

Discussions on Development Series

Upcoming Discussions

From Professional Athlete to Humanitarian, How I Became Involved in the Fight Against Poverty and DiseaseTuesday, April 15

"From Professional Athlete to Humanitarian, How I Became Involved in the Fight Against Poverty and Disease"

Ruth Riley
Center for the Atlanta Dream
Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA)
Spokesperson
UN Foundation's Nothing But Nets
Notre Dame Alumnae Class of 2001
http://www.ruthriley.com/
7:00 pm - Eck Visitor Center Auditorium

Previous Discussions

Academic Year 2013-14

Spring 2014

DoDWednesday, February 26

"From the Bottom Up: How Building Tomorrow Builds Capacity in Uganda"

George Srour
Founder + Chief Dreamer
Building Tomorrow, Inc.

7:00 pm - Hesburgh Center Room C103

From the Classroom to the Field: Navigating the First Five YearsWednesday, March 19

"From the Classroom to the Field: Navigating the First Five Years"

Shannon Coyne
Program Associate
Learning Tours at CARE
Notre Dame Alumnae Class of 2011

7:00 pm - Hesburgh Center Room C103

Fall 2013

"Moving Toward Fair Elections in Fragile Democracies?: A Personal and Intellectual Journey"Wednesday, October 30

"Moving Toward Fair Elections in Fragile Democracies?: A Personal and Intellectual Journey"

Clark Gibson
Professor of Political Science
Director of the International Studies Program
University of California San Diego

5:00 pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

"What Works in International Development?: Trying to Distill Some Lessons"Wednesday, September 25

"What Works in International Development?: Trying to Distill Some Lessons"

Steve Reifenberg
Executive Director
Kellogg Institute for International Studies

7:00 pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

Academic Year 2012-13

"Justice, Democracy, and Human Development in Kenya: The Significance of Kenya's 2013 Election"Wednesday, April 24

"Justice, Democracy, and Human Development in Kenya: The Significance of Kenya's 2013 Election"

Kerubo Okioga
Dandora Human Development Project
Holy Cross Parish
Kenya

Maurice Sikenyi
MA Candidate, International Peace Studies
Kroc Institute

Rev. Robert Dowd, CSC
Director, Ford Program
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow
University of Notre Dame

Moderated by:

Dennis Harazsko
Associate Program Director, Ford Program
University of Notre Dame

7:00 pm - Hesburgh Center Room C103

Business on the Frontlines: Reports from the FieldWednesday, April 10

Business on the Frontlines: Reports from the Field

Viva Bartkus
Associate Professor of Management and Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow

Emily Block
Assistant Professor of Management

and Business on the Frontlines Students

7:00 pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

Cosponsored with the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies

"Community-Driven Development in Uganda"Wednesday, February 6

Harriet Nakitende
Directorate of Outreach
Uganda Martyrs University

"Community-Driven Development in Uganda"

7:00pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

"The Catholic Church, Holy Cross, and Human Development in Bangladesh"Wednesday, November 28

Fr. Frank Quinlivan, CSC
Former Provincial of Holy Cross Priests in Bangladesh

"The Catholic Church, Holy Cross, and Human Development in Bangladesh"

7:00pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

"International Human Development: Has the US a Leadership Role?"Wednesday, October 3

Paul Collier
Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies
Oxford University

"International Human Development: Has the US a Leadership Role?"

7:00pm - Hesburgh Center Auditorium

Thursday, October 4

Paul Collier
Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies
Oxford University

Sean Callahan
Executive Vice President for Overseas Operations
Catholic Relief Services

"International Human Development and US Foreign Policy"

5:00pm - JW Marriott Chicago, 151 West Adams Street

 

Academic Year 2011-12

"Sustainable Urban Alternatives through Productive Public Spaces"Tuesday, April 3

Ford Program Discussions on Development Series

Discussion with Chelina Odbert, Co-founder and Principal of Kounkuey Design Initiative

"Sustainable Urban Alternatives through Productive Public Spaces"

7:00pm - C103, Hesburgh Center

“Ford Program Community Development Partnerships: Nnindye, Uganda and Dandora, KenyaWednesday, February 8

“Ford Program Community Development Partnerships: Nnindye, Uganda and Dandora, Kenya

Apolo Kasharu
Coordinator, University Partnership for Outreach, Research and Development
Uganda Martyrs University

Juliet Nambuubi
Community Outreach Officer, University Partnership for Outreach, Research and Development
Uganda Martyrs University

Dorrin Wagithi
Community Outreach Officer, Dandora Law and Human Development Project

7:00pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

"Global Causes and Consequences of Human Trafficking"Wednesday, November 30

Carolyn Nordstrom
Professor of Anthropology
Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow

"Global Causes and Consequences of Human Trafficking"

7:00pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

DoDOctober 24, 2011

Re-imagining Accompaniment: Global Health and Liberation Theology

A Dialogue with

Rev. Gustavo Gutierrez, OP
John Cardinal O'Hara Professor of Theology
Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow

Dr. Paul Farmer
Kolokotrones University Professor, Harvard University
Cofounder, Partners In Health

7:00pm - 101 Debartolo Hall

Cosponsored with the Center for Health Sciences Advising, the Center for Social Concerns, the Department of Theology, and the Eck Institute for Global Health

DoDOctober 6, 2011

Alumni in the Field

Winifred Fitzgerald '83
Madagascar Country Representative/Senior Resident Advisor, Better U Foundation

Clark Gibson '83
Department of Political Science, University of California, San Diego

Madeleine Philbin '81
Regional Director, Midwest, Catholic Relief Services

6:30pm
Eck Visitor's Center Auditorium

Cosponsored by the Alumni Association


Academic Year 2010-11

DoDWednesday, March 30 - 7:00pm

Ford Program Discussions on Development

Women and Political Representation: the Case of Uganda

Eileen Hunt Botting
Associate Professor of Political Science

Robert Esuruku
Kellogg Institute Visiting Fellow, Senior Lecturer, Institute of Ethics and Development Studies, Uganda Martyrs University

7:00pm - C103 Hesburgh Center

Rebuilding Haiti: Challenges and OpportunitiesWednesday, January 26 - 7:00pm

Discussions on Development - "Rebuilding Haiti: Challenges and Opportunities
Discussion with:
Tracy Kijewski-Correa
Associate Professor, Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences
Rev. Robert Loughery, csc
Notre Dame Haiti Program

C103 Hesburgh Center

DoDWednesday, November 17 - 7:00pm

Discussions on Development - "Microfinance, Entrepreneurship, and Fair Trade
Discussion with:
Ann-Marie Conrado
Associate Professional Specialist, Industrial Design
Joseph Kaboski
Associate Professor of Economics

Greenfield's International Cafe, Hesburgh Center

Watch Ann-Marie Conrado's video "Fighting for Opportunity" here.

 

 

DoDWednesday, October 27, 2010 - 7:00pm

Discussions on Development - "The Common Good, Corporate Responsibility and Human Rights"
Speakers:
Rev. Oliver Williams, CSC
Associate Professor and Director of the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Religious Values in Business at Mendoza College of Business
Douglass Cassel
Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights at the Notre Dame Law School

All are welcome
Greenfields International Cafe, Hesburgh Center

Cosponsored by the Notre Dame Forum.

Thursday, September 9, 2010 - 7:00pm

Alumni in the FieldAlumni in the Field

Matt McGarry (ND '00 College of Arts and Letters)
Country Representative, Afghanistan
Catholic Relief Services

John Polk (ND '97 College of Engineering)
Deputy Resident Country Director, Honduras
Millennium Challenge Corporation

Mary Claire Sullivan (ND '08, College of Business)
Formerly with Community Enterprise Solutions, Guatemala and Nicaragua
ND '12 MBA Candidate

7:00pm – Greenfield’s International Cafe, Hesburgh Center

 


Academic Year 2009-10

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 – 7:00pm

It's the Water, Stupid"It's the Water, Stupid"

Discussed by
David Lodge
Professor of Biological Sciences and
Director of Notre Dame's Center for Aquatic Conservation
Molly Lipscomb
Assistant Professor of Economics and Econometrics and
Kellogg Institute Faculty Fellow

7:00pm - LaFortune Montgomery Auditorium

Refreshments will be served

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 – 7:00pm

Is Charity Bad for Human Development? Reflections on Pope Benedict XVI’s Encyclical Caritas in Veritate"Is Charity Bad for Human Development? Reflections on Pope Benedict XVI’s Encyclical Caritas in Veritate"

Discussed by
Rev. Robert A. Dowd, CSC
Director, Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Maura Ryan
John Cardinal O'Hara, C.S.C. Associate Professor of Christian Ethics

7:00pm - Hammes Student Lounge, Coleman Morse Center (1st floor)

Refreshments will be served

December 2, 2009 - 7:00pm

The Role of the University in DevelopmentThe Role of the University in Development

Fr. Peter Kanyandago, Professor of Ethics and Development Studies at Uganda Martyrs Univeristy
Tamo Chattopadhay, Assistant Professor, Institute for Educational Initiatives

Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)
Refreshments will be served

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Relief vs. Development: Conflicting pathways to economic growth and political stability?"Relief vs. Development: Conflicting pathways to economic growth and political stability?"

Rahul Oka
Assitant Professor, Anthropology
Larissa Fast
Assistant Professor, Sociology

7:00pm - Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)
Refreshments will be served


Academic Year 2008-09

Wednesday, April 15, 2009 -7:30pm

The Cost of the Crisis: The Outlook for International DevelopmentThe Cost of the Crisis: The Outlook for International Development

Jeffrey Bergstrand, Professor of Finance
Rev. Robert Dowd, CSC, Professor of Political Science
Amitava Dutt, Professor of Economics and Policy Studies

Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)

How is the global economic crisis affecting the developing world? Notre Dame Professors of international finance, economics and political science will discuss the genesis of the global economic crisis and its impact on international trade as well as the possible economic effects of the crisis in the developing world and how these consequences of the crisis may affect democratization processes.

During the discussion, speakers will address what should be done; how policy makers in the "developed world" or global north can prevent the global economic crisis from resulting in a spike in extreme poverty, political instability, and a resurgence of authoritarian regimes in the "developing world" or global south.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009 - 7:00pm

Science, Technology, and DevelopmentScience, Technology, and Development

Mary Ann McDowell
Notre Dame Professor of Biology
Steve Silliman
Notre Dame Professor of Engineering


Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)

Abstract

This discussion will be devoted to exploring the great technological and scientific discoveries that have brought the "developed" world to where it is today and how these and other new innovations can help the "developing" world. Many, if not most, would argue that scientific progress and inventiveness is exactly what has led to development in much of the world and to the divergence between countries over the last 200 years. Why then have so many countries been left behind? How is it possible that we live in a world where some countries lack clean water, basic health care, and still cultivate by hand while others have complex water purification plants, do laser surgeries, and have elaborate industrial processes? Scientists who wish to make a difference for those living in extreme poverty must grapple not only with quandaries in the lab and the physical world but also with the complexities of the social world.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 7:00pm

The Impact of Religion on DevelopmentThe Impact of Religion on Development

Scott Appleby
Director of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies
Paul Kollman
Notre Dame Professor of Theology

Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)

Abstract

This discussion is devoted to exploring the impact that religion has had and may have on development processes. This topic raises immensely important questions because there is reason to believe that religious values may influence how people define and measure development in the first place. How do the world's great religions, especially Christianity and Islam, invite us to conceptualize, define and measure development? How have Christianity and/or Islam affected development in Sub-Saharan Africa and other regions of the global south? Is Western Christianity more conducive to development than Islam and other major world religions? What explains why Christianity and Islam vary across time and place in the extent to which they encourage the toleration, scientific inquiry and innovation that make development possible? Professors Scott Appleby and Paul Kollman will address these questions and many more.

Monday, February 16, 2009 - 7:00pm

The Meaning and Measure of DevelopmentThe Meaning and Measure of Development

Amitava Dutt
Notre Dame Professor of Economics
Carolyn Nordstrom
Notre Dame Professor of Anthropology

Coleman-Morse Lounge (1st floor)

Abstract

This discussion is devoted to exploring whether we can agree on the meaning and measures of development. Some may argue that development is relative and that each society/community should be able to define development for itself. While this might be a nice idea and might have been possible before peoples in the global south were colonized by Western powers, others may argue that it's too late for that now. Communities and societies that define and measure development in a way that is significantly different from the way it is commonly defined and measured in the West are certain to isolate and impoverish themselves even according their own definitions and measures. While many argue that Westerners should promote development without imposing their definition of the "good life", others hold that this is impossible; Westerners cannot promote development without imposing at least some of their values.